LiDAR survey

The project commissioned a LiDAR survey of the whole parish to find what features might be identified. LiDAR stands for Light Detection & Ranging and involves the use of a laser to measure the distance from the laser to a point on the ground. Such surveys can be done at different levels of detail from taking a reading every 2 metres down to every 25 centimetres. In our case we went for the latter to gives us a fine grained picture of the surface details.

Detail from the LiDAR survey carried out for the project.

Software has been used to remove features such as trees and buildings. What is left is the ground surface – this kind of survey doesn’t tell you what is in the ground, unlike other geophysical surveys. In the image here the height is colour coded, with blue being the lowest, moving through greens, yellows, oranges to the highest being reds.

As you can see, there are a number of features clearly visible here.  Circled in red at the top of the image is St Andrew’s church, and at the bottom the red circle identifies the gardens of the current hall. The black circle is the target area where we thought the old hall was situated. On the left side of the image there is the mysterious track-like feature identified in the Drone survey, as are the rectilinear features. Also clear is the extent of the ridge & furrow running across the landscape. On the right side of the image there is a long, elongated S-shape feature which is an old path or track-way from the hall that went to the church. The long feature running diagonally from the bottom right-hand corner is a modern pathway which has cut into historic landscape.

Close to the target area you can see there is a irregular linear feature running to the top of the picture, this is as yet unidentified as to exactly what it is. It does however, run up to a series of platforms and a small L-shaped earthwork bank. As for the target area itself, the dark shadow suggests that there is a hollow there, but it is otherwise featureless.

 

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